YuZhang (Erin)'s farewell party 2014HyDROS Students Conduct CREST Training Workshop with Namibia’s Department of HydrologyHyDROS Group Meeting Feb. 14th, 2014HyDROS Student Zac Flamig in Meetings with Officials from the Nigerian National Emergency Management AgencyDr. Di Long (UT Austin) with HyDROS groupHyDROS group with Dr. Huffman (third from left, photo by Berry)OSDC-PIRE Workshop in Edinburgh, ScotlandSPREAD workshop in Ft. Collins, ColoradoZac Flamig Hosted CREST Hydrologic Model Training Workshop in Kigali, RwandaHyDROS Members selected to Science TeamHyDROS Lab February 2013 MeetingNOXP Radar in France

Welcome to the Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (HyDROS) Laboratory

The HyDROS laboratory is a proud part of the University of Oklahoma (OU). We are located in the National Weather Center (NWC), Norman, Oklahoma. The HyDROS Lab is associated with the Advanced Radar Research Center (ARRC), Water Technology for Emerging Regions Center (WaTER), and the School of Civil Engineering & Environmental Science (CEES). The HyDROS Lab is a transdisciplinary research unit with synergy at the interface of remote sensing technology, water, weather, and climate. Scales of interest for modeling and prediction include the local, state, regional and global scales.

Global Streamflow Simulations for Flood & Drought Monitoring

http://eos.ou.edu

US Flash Flood Prediction System

http://flash.ou.edu

Meteorological Phenomena Identification Near the Ground

http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/projects/ping/

New Book – Radar Hydrology: Principles, Models, and Applications

Radar Hydrology
Published: December 23, 2014 by CRC Press
Radar Hydrology: Principles, Models, and Applications provides graduate students, operational forecasters, and researchers with a theoretical framework and practical knowledge of radar precipitation estimation. The only text on the market solely devoted to radar hydrology, this comprehensive reference:

  • Begins with a brief introduction to radar
  • Focuses on the processing of radar data to arrive at accurate estimates of rainfall
  • Addresses advanced radar sensing principles and applications
  • Covers radar technologies for observing each component of the hydrologic cycle
  • Examines state-of-the-art hydrologic models and their inputs, parameters, state variables, calibration procedures, and outputs
  • Discusses contemporary approaches in data assimilation
  • Concludes with methods, case studies, and prediction system design
  • Includes downloadable MATLAB® content

Flooding is the #1 weather-related natural disaster worldwide. Radar Hydrology: Principles, Models, and Applications aids in understanding the physical systems and detection tools, as well as designing prediction systems.


Editorial Reviews
“This is the first book on radar hydrology written by hydrologists. Whereas the excellent knowledge of radar technology by the authors permits an adequate coverage of the principles of rainfall rate estimation by radar, their hydrological background allows them to provide a unique message on the benefits (and on the remaining challenges) in exploiting radar techniques in hydrology. … In a clear and concise manner, the book combines topics from different scientific disciplines into a unified approach aiming to guide the reader through the requirements, strengths, and pitfalls of the application of radar technology in hydrology—mostly for flood prediction. Chapters include excellent discussion of theory, data analysis, and applications, along with several cross references for further review and useful conclusions.”


HyDROS Student Berry Attended 2014 Asia-Pacific Remote Sensing Symposium in China

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Berry with the GPM/DPR algorithm developer,
Dr. Toshio Iguchi

Meteorology Ph.D. candidate, Yixin ‘Berry’ Wen attended the 2014 Asia-Pacific Remote Sensing Symposium in Beijing from October 13-16, 2014. In the conference, Berry gave an oral presentation titled ‘Systematical evaluation of VPR-Identification and Enhancement (VPR-IE) approach for different precipitation types’. Several attendees provided valuable suggestions for her VPR-IE study. After the conference, Berry was invited by Professor Yunfei Fu to visit the Laboratory of Atmosphere Observation and Water Cycle at the University of Science and Technology of China.


HyDROS' Grand Challenge is to observe and predict the storage, movement, and quality of water across space-time scales by integrating advanced sensing technology and numerical predictive models into an end-to-end research and application framework.

HyDROS' Mission is to propose technological solutions for mitigating the impacts of climate change and natural hazards through interdisciplinary research and education by using the latest remote sensing technology, information technology, and hydrological models in collaboration with private and public organizations at both local and international levels for the creation of a resilient society.

We will pursue our Grand Challenge and Mission through transdisciplinary research and education involving faculty, students, and scientists with Engineering, Sciences, Math, and Socioeconomic Sciences backgrounds as well as cooperation with universities, governmental agencies, private companies/industry, and international counterparts.

We are always looking for talented and enthusiastic students and researchers. We have advised students major in Civil Engineering, Hydrology (Water Resource Engineering), Environmental Science (Water Track), Geography, Meteorology, Computer Science and Geoinformatics. For general information on the Graduate Programs, please visit the web site of Graduate College and respective Departments for application meterials. If you wish visit HyDROS, please contact yanghong@ou.edu for more information.